A nice clump of dandelions - what I usually catch on "opening day."

by Paul Vang
WritingOutdoors.com

A nice clump of dandelions – what I usually catch on “opening day.”

“When does the fishing season open?”

I occasionally get this question, especially in springtime, from people who are a bit confused about news reports about changes in Montana’s fishing regulations, especially the new regulation that waters in Montana’s Central District are, essentially, open year around.

The third Saturday in May (May 21 this year) is the traditional opening day of the Montana fishing season, but that date is now almost a footnote to the fishing regulations. The basic rule of thumb, now, is that if you want to go wet a line you can do it, if you can stand to be out there.

On the other hand, this doesn’t mean you don’t need to check the regulations before heading for your favorite fishing hole. There are still enough exceptions to the basic rules to fill a drift boat.http://writingoutdoors.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Vang.jpg

For example, the Madison River is now open to angling year around, but if you’re also hoping for a fish dinner, you need to be aware that the entire upper Madison River, from the Yellowstone Park boundary to Ennis Lake, is open to fishing, but it’s strictly catch-and-release for rainbow trout in some stretches, all trout in some stretches, though in most stretches an angler 14 years old or younger, may keep one trout, and in some stretches that one trout can be a rainbow.

On the other hand, on the lower Madison, from Ennis Dam to the mouth of the river, the only special regulation is that there’s no limit on northern pike.

On the Jefferson River, the 100 yards upstream and downstream from the creek mouths of Hells Canyon Creek and Willow Springs Creek is closed to fishing all of April and from September 30 through November 30.

On the Big Hole River, we still have the extended season for whitefish and catch and release for trout from December 1 to the third Saturday in May. Arctic grayling are always catch and release, and from Dickie Bridge to Melrose Bridge, it’s artificial lures only.

I could go on and on with special rules for various streams and lakes, but you get the idea. It is true that we can, essentially, go fishing any time of year, but you still need to pick up a set of regulations and then know where you are fishing and what, if any, special rules apply for where you are. That’s been the rule of thumb for years and it still is.

Not everybody agrees with year around fishing. I remember one Big Hole rancher, now deceased, who got tired of seeing drift boats on the river almost all year, lamenting that the fish never got a rest from the anglers, adding, “They’re all broke to halter and trained to lead.”

I’d guess that most of us might disagree that Big Hole trout have forgotten to put up a fight, though at the same time, we certainly see the occasional trout that has a hook scar or two.

An essential change among Montana’s anglers over the last 30 years or so, particularly on trout streams, is that a lot fewer people are taking fish home for dinner. While a lot of people still like to eat trout, catch and release is, for most, the general rule. On a personal basis, I know that about the only times I keep a trout is when I have an order for a trout dinner. When I do get that order for trout I’ll often head to one of the many headwaters creeks in our area and get a bunch of brook trout.

An old fishing partner used to do some guiding on the Big Hole and liked to tell stories about people he’d taken down the river, generally adding that a favorite part of the day was a shore lunch of fresh trout. I rather suspect that most people taking a guided float trip down a trout river, these days, would be shocked at the idea of having trout for lunch.

The times—they’ve been a’changing.

Suzanne Potter

BILLINGS, Mont. - The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers denied a permit on Monday for the massive Gateway Pacific Terminal, a coal-export facility proposed near Bellingham, Wash., that would have shipped coal to Asia from the Powder River Basin.

The Corps heeded complaints from the Lummi Nation that the project would harm tribal fishing rights.

In Montana, clean-energy advocates are holding a series of workshops this week to galvanize opposition to another proposal, the Millenium Bulk Terminal in Longview, Washington, partially owned by Arch Coal.

Les Anderson of Longview, vice president of Landowners and Citizens for a Safe Community, is in Montana this week for the workshops.

"It's still a real battle. This is not going to be easy to see this project go away," says Anderson. "No one can think that we're winning this. The coal company has a lot of political influence. In no way do I see this as a 'done deal.'"

The first workshop, organized by the Northern Plains Resource Council, was last night in Missoula.

There are two today in Helena and Livingston, and one on Wednesday in Billings.

The public comment period on the draft environmental impact statement on the Longview terminal opened April 29 and ends on June 13.

Anderson says the people of Montana who live along the rail lines face the same issues that worry many residents of Longview.

"From increased taxpayer costs for the new rail structures, to increased personal health-care costs for railroad neighbors with respiratory problems, this is another classic example of the coal companies making the profits, while the rest of us pay the cost," says Anderson.

The Northern Plains Resource Council says it will record all the public comments gathered in Montana, and enter them into the record at a public hearing being held by the State of Washington in Spokane on May 26.

The group says it also will send a delegation to speak at the hearing.

 

 

By John S. Adams,
 MontanaFreePress.com

Multiple news outlets on May 6 reported on Montana Gov. Steve Bullock’s release of three years’ worth of emails from his personal email account.

This latest inquiry into Bullock’s emails is in part related to Lt. Gov. Angela McClean’s abrupt departure from the governor’s office last fall.

McClean resigned her position on Nov. 30, 2015 to take a new job at office of the Commissioner of Higher Education. At the time Bullock and McClean deflected questions about why she left the job, though emails published in December indicate there was longstanding tension between the two.

The latest release of emails from Bullock’s personal emails account, which he sometimes uses to conduct state business, further demonstrate the strained relationship between Bullock and McClean prior to her departure.

MTFP obtained all 366-pages of emails and has published without commentary searchable versions of the documents here.

 

2013

DOCUMENT
PAGES
TEXT
Zoom
 
 
 
 
p. 1
 
 
 
p. 2
 
 
 
p. 3
 
 
 
«
Page 1 of  123
»
Bullock-Emails-2013
Contributed by: John Adams, Montana Free Press

 

2014

DOCUMENT
PAGES
TEXT
Zoom
 
 
 
 
p. 1
 
 
 
p. 2
 
 
 
p. 3
 
 
 
«
Page 1 of  131
»
Bullock-Emails-2014
Contributed by: John Adams, Montana Free Press

 

2015

DOCUMENT
PAGES
TEXT
Zoom
 
 
 
 
p. 1
 
 
 
p. 2
 
 
 
p. 3
 
 
 
«
Page 1 of  112
»
Bullock-Emails-2015
Contributed by: John Adams, Montana Free Press

Learn more about the work of “Montana Master” artist Harold Schlotzhauer as he leads museum visitors on a gallery talk of the Yellowstone Art Museum’s current exhibition Harold Schlotzhauer: The Shape of Motion. The talk takes place 6:30 – 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, May 19th.  The exhibition is the third in the YAM’s series of Montana Masters exhibitions, which focus on the work of a diverse selection of mature artists who have contributed significantly to Montana’s respected artistic reputation and traditions. The YAM is pleased to continue the series with the presentation of work by one of Montana’s most prolific and distinctive painters. With decades of experience behind him, Schlotzhauer continues to explore the intersection between the observable and the imagined, creating a vivid visual language that soars beyond the edges of the picture plane.  His brand of Modernism is bold and playful, but dazzlingly serious in its intent to create engaging images that make the intangible real.  Shapes, lines, and sweeping color dance together in choreographed movement to elicit a personal response from the viewer.  Schlotzhauer’s visual language is inspired by myriad sources, including traditional Asian arts, graffiti, children’s toys, and the rhythms of nature.

The exhibition surveys 50 years’ worth of Schlotzhauer’s art exploration, beginning with his art student days in California, where he graduated with a Master of Fine Arts degree with high distinction in 1966 from California College of Arts and Crafts, Oakland, through his retirement from Montana State University in Bozeman, Montana, after teaching there for 28 of his 41 years of teaching in higher education.  He was subsequently appointed Professor Emeritus by the University.  Since his retirement in 2008, Schlotzhauer has continued painting at his longtime Bozeman studio, which overlooks his home in the Gallatin Valley. This bold exhibition comprises colorful paintings, sculptures, kites, and various embellished skateboards, snowboards, balance boards, and surfboards.

A gifted educator and speaker, Schlotzhauer’s wisdom shines on the subject of Modernism, imparting knowledge that is accessible to art lovers at every level of their own art appreciation. This talk is part of the museum’s Distinguished Speakers series, which responds to current topics and issues addressed by museum exhibitions.

Admission to the museum is free to members.  Non-members can enjoy the talk and the other exhibition offerings for a modest admission. The Shape of Motion remains on view through July 3, 2016. Visit the museum’s website, artmuseum.org, to learn more about the museum’s other exhibitions and programs.


Sunday, May 1 rockin’ country music artist Colt Ford will be playing the Butte Depot. Doors open at 7:00 pm and tickets are $27.00 for all ages.


Some of Ford’s hits include “Crank It Up,” “Dirt Road Anthem,” and “Cut ‘Em All” featuring Duck Dynasty’s Willie Robertson. The show promises to be powerful and filled with high-energy.

Ford has had #1 hits, such as Jason Aldean’s “Dirt Road Anthem,” which he wrote, and Brantley Gilbert’s “Country Must Be Country Wide.” 

Ford has sold over one million albums and millions of song downloads, his Facebook page has over sixteen million likes and has as many YouTube views. Ford was also featured in Wall Street Journal.

In addition to being a gifted songwriter and artist, Colt is also a former professional golfer, and resides with his family in Athens, GA.

Colt Ford is touring in support of his new album “Answer To No One; The Colt Ford Classics.”